Jump to content

Custom Search





Welcome to the Lincoln MKZ Forum - home of the Lincoln MKZ Club


Sign In  Log in with Facebook

Create Account
Welcome to the Lincoln MKZ Forum. You must register to create topics or post in our community - but don't worry, this is a simple and free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be a part of the Lincoln MKZ Forum by signing up for a free account today and enjoy these benefits:
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members
  • Create a photo album and post photos
  • Receive special offers and discounts
  • Invitations to events. . .and more!
Click here to create an account now
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Check out the Lincoln Continental Forum Here.


Photo
- - - - -

Rear Door Locks

word to the wise

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 drolds1

drolds1

    New MKZ Member

  • Moderators
  • 943 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationLI, NY
  • My MKZ's Year:Decline
  • My MKZ: mymkz
  • Current Vehicle:2017 MKZ 3.0T AWD Sport Package

Posted 03 December 2015 - 02:58 AM

My two year-old grandson opened the rear door the other day while my wife was driving.  I didn't have the childproof locks engaged because I didn't think that he could reach the handle yet and thought that when the doors were locked that they couldn't be opened from the inside anyway.  I was wrong on both accounts.  After consulting the owner's manual, I found, to my surprise that  pulling the handle twice will open the door.  The first pull unlocks the door and the second pull will open the door.  To wit:

 

 

Rear Door Unlocking and Opening
Pull the interior door release handle twice to unlock and open the rear door. The first pull unlocks the door and the second pull will unlatch the door.

 

Whoa!  Obviously, he can't fall out since he's securely strapped into the child seat.  Fortunately, there were no other cars nearby when the door opened.

 

Needless to say, the childproof lock is now engaged. :doh:


  • JoeBrown likes this





Lose this advertisement by becoming a member. Click here to create a free account.

#2 R2D2

R2D2

    New MKZ Member

  • Lincoln MKZ Club Member
  • 181 posts
  • Region:U.S. Southern Atlantic
  • LocationPalm Coast, FL
  • My MKZ's Year:2014
  • My MKZ: mymkz
  • Current Vehicle:2014 MKZh

Posted 03 December 2015 - 04:41 AM

My two year-old grandson opened the rear door the other day while my wife was driving.  I didn't have the childproof locks engaged because I didn't think that he could reach the handle yet and thought that when the doors were locked that they couldn't be opened from the inside anyway.  I was wrong on both accounts.  After consulting the owner's manual, I found, to my surprise that  pulling the handle twice will open the door.  The first pull unlocks the door and the second pull will open the door.  To wit:

 

 

Whoa!  Obviously, he can't fall out since he's securely strapped into the child seat.  Fortunately, there were no other cars nearby when the door opened.

 

Needless to say, the childproof lock is now engaged. :doh:

 

 

Glad to hear that there was not an unhappy ending to this story, good work grandpa. :)


Edited by R2D2, 03 December 2015 - 04:42 AM.

R2D2

 

Beep-op-whir-boop-weeee

 

I'm a black and white type of guy, the only gray in my life is the hair on my head!


#3 JoeBrown

JoeBrown

    New MKZ Member

  • Lincoln MKZ Club Member
  • 348 posts
  • Region:U.S. Northeast
  • LocationMount Vernon, NY
  • My MKZ's Year:2014
  • My MKZ: mymkz
  • Current Vehicle:2014, 3.7L V6, AWD. Ruby Red/ Dune

Posted 03 December 2015 - 09:28 AM

I don't have the childproof locks engaged at this time. Perhaps I need to look at this again.

 

Thanks for the "heads up".



#4 NV Rick

NV Rick

    New MKZ Member

  • Lincoln MKZ Member
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Region:U.S. Pacific Coast
  • LocationPahrump NV
  • My MKZ's Year:2014
  • My MKZ: mymkz
  • Current Vehicle:2014 MKZ-h

Posted 05 December 2015 - 08:13 PM

After reading your post, it got me to thinking (which can sometimes be dangerous). If you have a child in the back and have the childproof locks engaged, that is a good thing. However, if you have them engaged when adults are in the back, it could lead to unintended consequences. If, God forbid, you were to have an accident where the driver is incapacitated, the rear seat passengers could then be trapped in the car. It may be a pita to engage/disengage the child proof locks as needed, but it is something to think about.

It would be more convenient if the locks could be engaged based on passenger weight, wherein if a passenger weighing more than, say, 85lbs would disengage the locks, or at least be able to do so from the driver's seat.



#5 drolds1

drolds1

    New MKZ Member

  • Moderators
  • 943 posts
  • Region:Decline
  • LocationLI, NY
  • My MKZ's Year:Decline
  • My MKZ: mymkz
  • Current Vehicle:2017 MKZ 3.0T AWD Sport Package

Posted 06 December 2015 - 03:04 AM

After reading your post, it got me to thinking (which can sometimes be dangerous). If you have a child in the back and have the childproof locks engaged, that is a good thing. However, if you have them engaged when adults are in the back, it could lead to unintended consequences. If, God forbid, you were to have an accident where the driver is incapacitated, the rear seat passengers could then be trapped in the car. It may be a pita to engage/disengage the child proof locks as needed, but it is something to think about.

It would be more convenient if the locks could be engaged based on passenger weight, wherein if a passenger weighing more than, say, 85lbs would disengage the locks, or at least be able to do so from the driver's seat.

 

Right after the above incident,  I thought Ford made a mistake in having the locks operate that way.  The more I thought about it, I realized that the absence of a manual lock/unlock device raises the possibility of people being trapped in the rear of the car under certain circumstances and it's actually a safety device. You just have to know how they work, though.  And yes, having the childproof locks engaged could lead to unintended consequences.  








Custom Search


Privacy Policy Terms of Service ·